Travel with these tunes

Orion will put images of space to mind, but looking out to the land below will leave you speechless.

Chandler Higa

Orion will put images of space to mind, but looking out to the land below will leave you speechless.

Taking a road trip with family or friends? Flying anywhere in or out of the country? In any case, it’s always nice to listen to music to escape the confines of your car or airplane.

If you’re spending 4 or more hours traveling, why not make it another memorable part of your trip?
If you’re spending 4 or more hours traveling, why not make it another memorable part of your trip?

The majority of the selected songs are instrumental. Land surveyor and Decatur resident Michael Blankinship spends about 10 to 15 hours a week on the road, and prefers songs without lyrics.

“I believe that instrumental music can take our imaginations to places that we dream of visiting or traveling [to],” Blankinship said. “Words sometimes get in the way of the moods we seek to possess.”

“Soothsayer” by Buckethead – (INSTRUMENTAL) The perfect song for road trips, this rock tune begins with a soft clean guitar phrase and an early entrance to a catchy drum and bass rhythm. The soft melody repeats itself before introducing a heavy-set chorus to wake you up from the induced slumber, and if that didn’t jolt you awake, then the insanely fast guitar solo definitely will. With a mix of soft melodies and heavy riffs, you won’t want to be stuck on the road without this beauty of a song.

“Orion” by Metallica –  (INSTRUMENTAL) Even if you’re not a fan of the hard-hitting riffs of the hard-rock/heavy metal genre of music, Orion by Metallica will paralyze you with awe as your flight takes off. The song begins with a soft but distorted guitar phrase that begins to merge with the sound of the jet engines outside, steadily getting louder until you can only hear the phrase. When the drums make their soft entrance, the airplane’s wheels will have left the ground. The main riff kicks in shortly after, and it will keep driving your plane onward and upward. Once the plane has reached its maximum altitude, Orion will keep you ascending to outer space. You may picture planets and galaxies forming in front of your eyes. It keeps you there until the song reaches its end, bringing you gently back to Earth with a familiar phrase that slowly fades to silence.

Orion will put images of space to mind, but looking out to the land below will leave you speechless.
Orion will put images of space to mind, but looking out to the land below will leave you speechless.

“Car Radio” by Twenty One Pilots – This is a simplistic song, consisting of a piano, drums and some artificial sounds. Dominated by lyrics containing raw emotion, Twenty One Pilots delivers Car Radio like it could be slam poetry. The lyrics describe a car radio theft victim coping with his silent drives. He has run out of things to take his mind off of his own dark thoughts and the silence forces him to come to terms with reality. You won’t have that same feeling, though, because you’ll be listening to Car Radio.

“Stairway to Heaven” by Led Zeppelin –  Junior Joseph Berkesch says, “literally anything by Led Zeppelin is great traveling music.” Stairway to Heaven is definitely not an exception. There’s never a bad time to listen to the most requested song of the 70’s. It begins with an acoustic melody accompanied with the poetry of the lyrics. As the song progresses, it gets faster and faster, and, just after Jimmy Page’s legendary guitar solo, the fast-moving finale phrase comes. If the rest of the song didn’t get you, then the final riffs of Stairway will leave a lasting impression on you.

“Cliffs of Dover” by Eric Johnson – (INSTRUMENTAL) A great song for road trips and airplanes alike, Cliffs of Dover will keep you in good company as you travel. The entire song is a complicated guitar piece, beginning with an even more complicated solo. In a few seconds, the solo ends and transfers to the main riff of the song. In its entirety, Cliffs of Dover has a very classic feel to it, despite having been released in 1990. The main tune of the song in itself is very catchy, with a very upbeat feel and tone to it. It’s sure to keep you humming the catchy chorus long after the song is over.

“Rat Salad” by Black Sabbath – (INSTRUMENTAL) Before you listen to this song, set up your air drums and prepare yourself. The song begins with a simple, soothing guitar solo, backed by a catchy bass riff and drum beat. The beginning phrase happens once more, the guitar plays its last note and the drum solo kicks in. At this point, feel free to simply destroy your air drum set. You may get weird looks from other passengers, and flight attendants may tap your shoulder and tell you that you’re scaring small children, but if you’re drumming along with Bill Ward, then you’ve earned the right to have fun with Rat Salad.

“Vagabond” by Wolfmother –  This is definitely a “feel-good” song that signifies the end of a journey. When the pilot announces the beginning of your descent, or when you reach the last few miles of your road trip, put this song on the radio and let the rolling notes of Vagabond flow. The ambient noise at the end of the song will fade, signifying the end of the song, just as you have reached the end of your trip.