Black History Month comes to the High Museum

Amani Bright

Gordon Parks makes his way to the High Museum with his exhibition Segregation Story right in time for Black History Month. The exhibition unveils over 40 in color photographs, some being viewed for the first time ever. Originally for a 1950s Life magazine article, the pictures open a window of perspective into the trials and tribulations of multigenerational families living in segregated Alabama.

Parks's early life of living in poverty and segregation sparked his artistic ambitions. "I picked up a camera because it was my choice of weapons against what I hated most about the universe: racism, intolerance, poverty," Parks said.
Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/legalcode#sthash.b29wuYjO.dpuf                                                        Parks’s early life of living in poverty and segregation sparked his artistic ambitions. “I picked up a camera because it was my choice of weapons against what I hated most about the universe: racism, intolerance, poverty,” Parks said.

Along side Segregation Story, Leonard Freed also brings his vision of exposing personal life experiences of African Americans during the civil right era in his exhibition Black in White America. While traveling in Germany in 1962, Freed noticed a black solider guarding the divide between East and West Germany. The fact that this solider was defending a country in which his own rights weren’t fully recognized enraged Freed and pushed him to illustrate their fight for equality among their every day lives.