Should the Baseball HOF have inducted steroid-era players?

tossup

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Yes (Sam Levy)

The home run leader was not inducted to the Hall of Fame. A pitcher won 7 Cy Young awards – the most in history – and didn’t come close to making the Hall. Yes, steroids are bad, and I am not telling developing athletes to indulge in them, but we should let these baseball heroes in. How can we pretend these achievements didn’t happen? Steroids might have helped a little, but let’s see an average Joe take steroids and hit 762 home runs or strike out 4672 batters.
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No (Wilson Witherspoon)

Inducting steroid-era players into the Baseball Hall of Fame isn’t about performance. It’s about legacy – not just the reputations of the players, but of the sport itself. By turning down players like Barry Bonds and Roger Clemens, baseball sends the message that, over time, it has no room for cheaters. Steroid-era players should not be inducted into the Hall of Fame, making sure that their memory is as tainted as their careers. This may seem extreme, but it’s the only way for baseball to keep fighting in the war on performance-enhancing drugs.

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