Song of the Week: Give Peace a Chance

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When “Give Peace a Chance” was released in 1969, the United States was in the midst of one of its longest, most criticized conflicts: the Vietnam War. The song, written and performed by John Lennon, Yoko Ono and the Plastic Ono Band, became an anthem of the American anti-war movement for the following decade. Now, half a century later, the tune still rings true for Americans across the nation. 

“All we are saying, is give peace a chance.” 

“All we are saying, is give peace a chance.” 

Just last week, 31 people were senselessly killed as a result of lacking gun reform. Before that, the inhumane treatment of immigrants seeking asylum in America sparked outrage across social media. And, once more, the ever so debated topic about women’s rights and gender equality was in the forefront of media. If anything, this song is relevant now more than ever; while the U.S. may not currently be at war, its people certainly are. 

“All we are saying, is give peace a chance.” 

“All we are saying, is give peace a chance.” 

The chorus of voices singing together, combined with the steady beat of drums and clapping, rally people to unify, take to the streets and demand a less violent, more peaceful world. The first few lyrics, “Ev’rybody’s talking about Bagism, Shagism, Dragism, Madism, Ragism, Tagism This-ism, that-ism, is-m, is-m, is-m,” ridicule how people have separated into groups based off of differences. But as the world becomes a smaller and more polarized place, this song reminds us to focus on our similarities with others, and how we should all strive for a more peaceful planet. 

“Everybody now, come on.”

“All we are saying, is give peace a chance.” 

“All we are saying, is give peace a chance.” 

“Come together, all together.”

Photo Courtesy of Creative Commons.

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