Medical marijuana law shot down in GA

Parents rally outside the Capitol building hoping their efforts will result in the legalization of cannabis oil.

Parents rally outside the Capitol building hoping their efforts will result in the legalization of cannabis oil.

As children and parents patiently wait for the verdict of Georgia’s medical marijuana bill, they pray for a day where they can find refuge from their ailments. They find nothing but disappointment when they hear that it was voted down in the House.

With around 70 seizures per day, toddler Haleigh Cox constantly fights for her life. The four year old has been suffering from uncontrolled epilepsy and struggles to find a medication that does not completely drain her body and brain.

 

“She’s unable to sit unassisted. She’s unable to hold her head up and a lot of that is because of the seizure medications shutting down her brain so much,” mother, Janea Cox said.

 

With the bill dying down, the Cox family feels they have no other choice but to move to Colorado, where pot is legal and accessible to the ill. However, her father, Brian Cox, will not be able to join his family in CO due to work responsibilities.

 

“Hopefully this medication will work and we’ll be able to get our child back,” he said.

 

Georgian legislators and governor, Nathan Deal, are outraged at the rejection of the medical oil as well.

Deal said in an interview that, “One option would be for Georgia Regents University (GRU) to partner with a private pharmaceutical company to expand clinical trials of cannabis oil to some Georgia patients.”

 

Cannabis oil has proven to be the most effective treatment of cancers and illnesses thus far and without it, patients’ lives are at stake.

 

Survivor Carrie Yelland suffered from anal cancer for years and tried all the pills and treatments out there before she discovered cannabis oil.

 

“I spent my days in agony, waiting for evening so I could try to sleep,” Yelland said.

 

After months of treating the cancer, her doctor gave her the chance to try the oil.

 

“My heart was pounding so loudly I could hear the whooshing in my ears,” she said. “Tears streaming down my face, I hugged him mumbling, ‘thank you, thank you,’”

 

Her and many more find refuge in the use of cannabis oil, while Georgians wait for the day when it can be legalized.