Wireless change leads to complaints

Students+have+disagreed+with+the+wireless+password+change%2C+but+the+media+center+staff+assures+Decatur+that+the+change+is+only+temporary.

Amelia Thomas

Students have disagreed with the wireless password change, but the media center staff assures Decatur that the change is only temporary.

It is not uncommon at Decatur to see students in class with their laptops and iPads. Even though cell phones aren’t allowed in class, witnessing students using their smart phones is not a rarity, either.

The first week back from February break, however, those students had a surprise waiting for them when they opened up their browsers to check their email.

The media center changed the wireless password so that students’ external devices would not have access to the school’s wireless network.

Immediately, an uproar of complaints and disagreements rose from students who bring their devices to school each day.

Media clerk Susan Riley cleared up some of the concerns by explaining the current problems with the internet.

“There was a tremendous increase in hand-held technology after [December break] – computers, iPads, iPhones, iTouches, etc,” she said, “So much so that our computers couldn’t function.”

According to Riley, this increase in technology accounts for the slow pace of many of Decatur’s computers. “We all have had to wait a ridiculous amount of time for a computer to log on!” she said.

Riley assures students that the problem will soon be fixed and recognizes that the password change has been trouble for many students.

“We certainly hope that [the change will be temporary], especially for the students who truly need access at school for school work and feel impaired because they can no longer access,” Riley said.

In terms of fixing the internet, the school is attempting to purchase a guest account for the server that should speed up the network. There is some difficulty, however, in that this purchase will be very expensive for the school.

“Although no time frame has been mentioned,” Riley said, “our system technology department is well aware of the need to make it happen A.S.A.P.”