Social Networks Hit Home

Social+Networks+Hit+Home

Greg Thomas

Students Use Social Networks To Communicate

A young man comes home, hops on his laptop and logs into his Facebook while checking
Twitter on his cell phone. He begins to post a rant about being bullied at school. He wishes he
could make it all end. His father has suspected that something is wrong but doesn’t feel the need to
ask. The next day the young man takes a gun to school and ends his problems and his life.
Social media seems to be taking over teenagers’ communication. Some teens run to social media
networks like Facebook and Twitter to vent their problems before ever approaching their parents.
According to a national study, 73% of teens use a social network. Also 55% of teens have given
out personal information to someone they don’t know, including photos and physical descriptions.
This should be a red flag to most parents because 88% of parents know that their teens typically
use the Internet to communicate with people they don’t know in the offline world.
Teens aren’t talking to their parents. In fact,  67% of teenagers say they know how to hide what
they do online from their parents.
In a “New York Daily News” article,  Erik Ortiz covers a mysterious death that involved Twitter.
He describes Hannah Truelove, a 16 year-old who used Facebook, went missing and was later
found dead. Police suspect that she was killed by a stalker. The story showcased that she had
posted tweets days before her death addressing her fears. Her father said she made never
mentioned her concerns to him.
Decatur students make decisions about sharing details with their parents versus social media.
Some students would continue to use Facebook and Twitter to vent.
“Yes, I would use social networks to express how I feel or things going on with me,” sophomore
Keshia Sullivan said.
While others say they would prefer not to tell Mom or Dad.
“I would keep it to myself unless they asked,” senior Elisabeth Azumah said.
Social networking remains popular, and talking to parents isn’t a thing of the past.
“I like to talk to my mother about it first, then go to Twitter,” said senior Ayanna Holt.

Source